Jes Best French Macarons
This is a large batch and yields about 100 macaron shells!
300 g icing sugar, ideally without corn starch
300 g almond flour
110 g egg whites, ideally aged 1-2 days
+
110 g egg whites, ideally aged 1-2 days
100 g water
300 g granulated sugar, ideally caster sugar
Optional
gel food coloring
flavoring(s)
300 g icing sugar, ideally without corn starch
300 g almond flour
110 g egg whites, ideally aged 1-2 days
+
110 g egg whites, ideally aged 1-2 days
100 g water
300 g granulated sugar, ideally caster sugar
Optional
gel food coloring
flavoring(s)
Prepare 4 half sheet baking pans by lining them with Silpat macaron mats. I prefer the Silpat mats to parchment. They provide good “grip” so the macaron batter maintains a perfect circle shape. The Silpat mats also aid in an even release whereas parchment can often stick to macarons.
Sift icing sugar and almond flour together 2-3 times. Ideally using a fine mesh sieve.
Add 110g egg whites to sugar/almond mixture. Using a silicone bowl scraper, combine to form a firm paste. Cover with saran wrap and set aside.
Put 110g egg whites in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment.
Combine granulated sugar and water in a small sauce pan fitted with a candy thermometer. To avoid crystallization, brush water droplets down sides of pan with a wet pastry brush. Place on medium-high heat. Do not stir.
When sugar mixture reaches 110ºC, start mixing egg whites on medium-high speed.
When sugar mixture reaches 118ºC, remove from heat and add to egg whites slowly. Increase mixer speed to high and whisk until mixture is a glossy meringue and forms stiff peaks.
Add coloring and/or dry flavorings at this time. Whisk a bit until color is even.
Add egg white meringue to sugar/almond mixture about 1/3 at a time. Using a silicone bowl scraper, fold and push the mixture until the ingredients are well combined. This technique is called Macaronage.
After all of the egg white meringue has been added. Keep folding until the batter runs off your scraper in ribbons. If it falls off in a clump the batter is still too thick.
Transfer batter to a pastry bag fitted with a plain round tip. I use Ateco #805. Don’t forget to twist the bag near the nozzle so batter doesn’t drip out before you’re ready.
Holding piping tip absolutely perpendicular to baking sheet, pipe rounds using the Silpat Macaron mat as a guide, stopping about 1/4″ short of the template (batter will spread). Reduce pressure and jerk nozzle away and to the side quickly to avoid a peak. Or try piping from the side to ensure a smooth macaron shell.
Drop each sheet on work surface a few times to release trapped air. Let stand at room temperature for 40-50 minutes (depending on humidity). Macarons should “set” and be dry to the touch before baking.
Preheat oven to 300º
Bake one sheet at a time for about 11 minutes. Watch carefully and remove from oven when fully cooked but before edges start to brown. To test for doneness, press lightly on a macaron. It should be firm on it’s “feet” and not fall or slide.
Let cool for a few minutes on baking sheets. Then transfer cookies to a rack to cool completely.
Once completely cool, sandwich two same-size macarons with a dollop of desired filling. Serve immediately. Or store in a cool dry place for a few days. Avoid storing in an airtight container. Macaron shells will absorb moisture from the filling causing a soggy cookie.

*Most liquified egg whites [in the carton] are not recommended for meringue.

Flavorings: Add flavorings like fruit zest, extracts, matcha powder, cocoa or coffee to the egg whites before adding them to icing sugar/almond mixture. This technique will ensure even distribution of flavor [as it does with color].